Jawfish Blue Spotted  - Opistognathus rosenblatti - Marine World Aquatics

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Blue Spotted Jawfish - Opistognathus rosenblattiThe beautiful Blue Spotted Jawfish is native to the sandy bays of the Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez), at depths...
Regular price £180.00

Collection: Fish

Blue Spotted Jawfish - Opistognathus rosenblatti

The beautiful Blue Spotted Jawfish is native to the sandy bays of the Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez), at depths between 9-27m (30-90ft). The waters in this area are somewhat colder than the waters where most popular tropical marine fish are collected, and this must be taken into account if planning to keep this species in the home aquarium; a means of chilling the water will certainly be necessary throughout the warmer months. Blue Spotted Jawfish make a fascinating addition to mature reef aquaria, providing that a few key requirements (including the aforementioned low water temperature) are met. These industrious bottom dwellers need a mixed substrate that is at least 10cm (3.9”) deep. Ideally this will be comprised of 75% coral sand, and 25% small pieces of reef rubble (varying from approx. 0.5cm to 1.5cm in diameter). This will allow to the fish to construct a burrow, in which it will spend much time resting just inside the entrance, seemingly watching the world go by and waiting for food morsels to drift past overhead. At other times it will be busy rearranging things in and around its little tunnel, which can be very entertaining to observe. At night they sometimes close the entrance of the burrow with a larger pebble as they reverse in. The aquarium must have a tight fitting cover, as these fish will jump, and lighting should always be turned on gradually so as not to startle your fish. Their constant excavation and digging means that powerful filtration and water movement is prerequisite. Blue Spotted Jawfish may be kept in small groups if you have a vast set-up; in fact they often do better this way, but do ensure that there is adequate space for them all to construct their homes (in the wild they may live as close as 90cm to one another). Ideally all will be introduced at the same time to eliminate any territorial issues. If the aquarium is on the smaller side, it really is better to keep a single specimen or a known mated pair (although bear in mind the tank must have floor space of at least 3ft x 2ft to keep just one of these fish comfortably, 5ft+ for more than one specimen). Tankmates, if desired, should be small and docile and enjoy the same coolwater conditions. This species may also be seen on sale as Rosenblatt's Jawfish.

We are extremely confident in the health of all livestock we send out and combined with our shipping methods offer your our Live Arrival Guarantee. In order to eligible for our Live Arrival Guarantee, please note the following:
YOU MUST ADHERE TO THE FOLLOWING DOA (DEAD ON ARRIVAL) PROCEDURE CORRECTLY, FAILING TO DO SO WILL NULIFY YOUR CLAIM.
In the unlikelihood of your order being DOA please email or telephone us within 1 hour of signing for the package on day of receipt.
EMAIL: info@marine-world.co.uk (leave a telephone number to call you back on)
TEL: 07779162162 / 01274416425
Once you have notified us you then have 24 hours to provide us with the following photographic evidence:
For marine fish we require:
  • A clear photograph of the fish in its original sealed bag, you must capture the entire bag with contents and seal still in tact clearly evident before taking the 2nd picture.
  • A clear photograph of the fish out of its sealed bag and water, with its entire rear caudal tail fin cut off.
  • You will know if your fish is dead as it will sink down to the bottom, observe for fin movement and discolouration, most fish sink when they die, but float to the top as they begin to rot. Closely observe the aquatic life upon acclimatising if it hasn’t moved don’t presume its dead but sometimes they are just resting. We advise to add air stone to acclimatising this will increase oxygen level to your live stock. Monitor the fins and gills for any sort of tiny movements, if in doubt call us.
For marine inverts we require:
  • A clear photograph of the fish in its original sealed bag, you must capture the entire bag with contents and seal still in tact clearly evident before taking the 2nd picture.
  • A clear photograph of the marine invert out of its sealed bag and water, with the invert being either cut in half or a sharp object such as a small knife skewered directly through it.
For corals we require:
  • A clear photograph of the fish in its original sealed bag, you must capture the entire bag with contents and seal still in tact clearly evident before taking the 2nd picture.
  • A close up photograph of the coral out of its sealed bag but still in water, (Photographs taken of corals not in water, will not be accepted, as some corals can look distorted/dead out of water).
  • All photographs need to be clear and not distorted. Photographs that do not clearly show their subject will be unable to be accepted as evidence.
  • Failure to be present to sign for your parcel on the first delivery attempt will void all claims. Failure to follow Marine World Aquatics specified DOA reporting procedure will also void any claims.
  • On satisfactory evidence that the marine life is DOA a credit note will be issued.
Please see review our recommended acclimatisation procedures for corals below to ensure your new coral adjusts to your system with the least possible stress.
Acclimatising your new corals is a vital process to ensure they survive and thrive in your system. People use many different methods but most of them are very similar, below is our preferred choice:
  • Unpack coral carefully from box and keep it in the polythene bag or container that it was shipped in.
  • Float the bag or container in your sump area or main tank for around 20 minutes, this will equalise the temperature of the water in the bag to that of the system it is going to be placed.
  • Open the bag or place coral with shipping water into another small container.
  • Using a piece of airline or similar with an air control valve attached, if one not available then just tie a knot in the airline, start a siphon from the main system and drip water slowly from there into the bag/container housing the new coral ( I use around one drip per two seconds ). Once the bag/container is near full then disregard some of the water and continue the process (never put any of the shipping water into your system). I persevere with this process for around 90 minutes to ensure the new coral is fully acclimatised to the new water conditions.
  • Now it is time to remove the coral from bag/container and carefully place it in your tank somewhere near the bottom. Leave it there and raise it slowly over a period of days so as it can adjust to the different lighting on your tank.
This careful process is vital to ensuring your coral or any other livestock’s long term success.
The same above process can be use for Fish and Inverts however this is not recommended, we strongly advise you put all livestock into a quarantine tank for 30 days where you can observe it before placing it into your display tank, make sure you follow the above procedure before placing livestock into your quarantine tank
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