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CONCH ORANGE LIP Brilliant snails at keeping the sand turned over and clean. These have a passive nature and are more active in the day then the night. Make sure...
Regular price £2.35

Collection: Fish

CONCH ORANGE LIP

Brilliant snails at keeping the sand turned over and clean. These have a passive nature and are more active in the day then the night. Make sure your tank is not less than 10 gallons as they grow to approximately 2.0 inches in length. Known as the wonder cleaners as they spend their day cleaning the tank eating most unwanted things.

CLEANER SHRIMP

The Cleaner Shrimp acts like the medic of any saltwater aquarium. In fact, this active cleaner will set up shop on live rock or coral outcroppings and wait for fish to come and be cleaned of ectoparasites or dead tissue. Many fish value its services so highly that they even allow the Cleaner Shrimp to clean inside of their mouths without harming the shrimp. No matter how your fish use the Shrimp's services, it is easy to see why this peaceful creature is so popular amongst home aquarists.

FIRE SHRIMP

The Fire Shrimp prefers a habitat providing it with a cave or overhang where the lighting is not too intense. While it will tolerate its mate, others of its own kind will be chased away or harassed. It is generally peaceful with most other organisms in the reef system unless they impinge on its territory. As a "cleaner shrimp," it will set up cleaning stations and remove dead tissue and parasites from fish that present themselves. It will also scavenge for meaty bits along the substrate bottom. Often, only its antennae will be visible. It will not tolerate copper or high levels of nitrates in the aquarium, but will require correct levels of iodine in the water to promote proper molting.

HERMIT CRAB

The  Hermit Crab is a voracious scavenger. Like its Blue Leg cousin, the Hermit Crab serves as an ideal member of your marine or reef aquarium's cleanup crew. This omnivore will scavenge all over your live rock and sand substrate - finding its way into the tightest of spaces - to feed on algae and detritus.

TIGER COWRIE

The Tiger Cowrie has an egg-shaped, spotted, glossy shell and is in high demand for the rock aquarium. It differs in color depending upon geographical location. While it does not have an operculum to shut when it retracts its mantle into its shell, the opening is lined with "threatening" tooth-like structures. Normally, the mantle will completely cover its shell unless it feels threatened. This helps it keep its lustrous white and brown mottled coloration, while its mantle will appear like a fingerprint of black and gray, with many short papillae over the surface.

TURBO SNAILS

The Chestnut Turbo Snail, also known as the Turbo Snail, Turban Snail, or Top Shell, is found in holes and crevices of the reef. It is shaped like a top, or turban, and has a thick shell with an irridescent interior.

NASSARIUS SNAIL

The Nassarius snail is a tiny scavenger with an oval spiral shell that resembles an olive pit, with a long tube-like siphon that protrudes from the end of the shell. One of the most ideal scavenger and detritus eaters, these snails are perfect for the reef aquarium, quickly consuming detritus, uneaten food, decaying organics, and fish waste. Nassarius Snails like to bury themselves in the sand, which will help maintain adequate oxygen levels in the substrate.

SAND SIFTING STARFISH

The Sand Sifting Sea Star, at first glance, seems to be drably colored like most bottom dwellers. But closer inspection reveals a striking beauty and serenity to the alternating bands of brown and beige that dress this invertebrate's thick, spine-covered arms. Like other starfish, Astropecten polycanthus efficiently consumes mass amounts of detritus and uneaten foods. This nocturnally active member of the Astropectinidae family can move large amounts of sand as it burrows into the substrate in its search for food.

MULTIPACK 1

5 Hermit Crabs

5 Turbo Snails

5 Nassarius Snails

 

MULTIPACK 2

10 Hermit Crabs

1 Cleaner Shrimp

10 Nassarius Snails

 

MULTIPACK 3

25 Hermit Crabs

1 Sandsifting Starfish

10 Nassarius Snails

10 Turbo Snails

WE AIM TO POST NEXT DAY BUT DUE TO STOCK LEVELS THIS MAY BE DELAYED TILL THE FORTHCOMING WEDNESDAY OF NEW STOCK!. WE WILL SEND AN EMAIL TO CONFIRM DISPATCH. PLEASE MAKE SURE SOMEONE IS HOME WHEN YOUR ITEMS ARE BEING DELIVERED.

We are extremely confident in the health of all livestock we send out and combined with our shipping methods offer your our Live Arrival Guarantee. In order to eligible for our Live Arrival Guarantee, please note the following:
YOU MUST ADHERE TO THE FOLLOWING DOA (DEAD ON ARRIVAL) PROCEDURE CORRECTLY, FAILING TO DO SO WILL NULIFY YOUR CLAIM.
In the unlikelihood of your order being DOA please email or telephone us within 1 hour of signing for the package on day of receipt.
EMAIL: info@marine-world.co.uk (leave a telephone number to call you back on)
TEL: 07779162162 / 01274416425
Once you have notified us you then have 24 hours to provide us with the following photographic evidence:
For marine fish we require:
  • A clear photograph of the fish in its original sealed bag, you must capture the entire bag with contents and seal still in tact clearly evident before taking the 2nd picture.
  • A clear photograph of the fish out of its sealed bag and water, with its entire rear caudal tail fin cut off.
  • You will know if your fish is dead as it will sink down to the bottom, observe for fin movement and discolouration, most fish sink when they die, but float to the top as they begin to rot. Closely observe the aquatic life upon acclimatising if it hasn’t moved don’t presume its dead but sometimes they are just resting. We advise to add air stone to acclimatising this will increase oxygen level to your live stock. Monitor the fins and gills for any sort of tiny movements, if in doubt call us.
For marine inverts we require:
  • A clear photograph of the fish in its original sealed bag, you must capture the entire bag with contents and seal still in tact clearly evident before taking the 2nd picture.
  • A clear photograph of the marine invert out of its sealed bag and water, with the invert being either cut in half or a sharp object such as a small knife skewered directly through it.
For corals we require:
  • A clear photograph of the fish in its original sealed bag, you must capture the entire bag with contents and seal still in tact clearly evident before taking the 2nd picture.
  • A close up photograph of the coral out of its sealed bag but still in water, (Photographs taken of corals not in water, will not be accepted, as some corals can look distorted/dead out of water).
  • All photographs need to be clear and not distorted. Photographs that do not clearly show their subject will be unable to be accepted as evidence.
  • Failure to be present to sign for your parcel on the first delivery attempt will void all claims. Failure to follow Marine World Aquatics specified DOA reporting procedure will also void any claims.
  • On satisfactory evidence that the marine life is DOA a credit note will be issued.
Please see review our recommended acclimatisation procedures for corals below to ensure your new coral adjusts to your system with the least possible stress.
Acclimatising your new corals is a vital process to ensure they survive and thrive in your system. People use many different methods but most of them are very similar, below is our preferred choice:
  • Unpack coral carefully from box and keep it in the polythene bag or container that it was shipped in.
  • Float the bag or container in your sump area or main tank for around 20 minutes, this will equalise the temperature of the water in the bag to that of the system it is going to be placed.
  • Open the bag or place coral with shipping water into another small container.
  • Using a piece of airline or similar with an air control valve attached, if one not available then just tie a knot in the airline, start a siphon from the main system and drip water slowly from there into the bag/container housing the new coral ( I use around one drip per two seconds ). Once the bag/container is near full then disregard some of the water and continue the process (never put any of the shipping water into your system). I persevere with this process for around 90 minutes to ensure the new coral is fully acclimatised to the new water conditions.
  • Now it is time to remove the coral from bag/container and carefully place it in your tank somewhere near the bottom. Leave it there and raise it slowly over a period of days so as it can adjust to the different lighting on your tank.
This careful process is vital to ensuring your coral or any other livestock’s long term success.
The same above process can be use for Fish and Inverts however this is not recommended, we strongly advise you put all livestock into a quarantine tank for 30 days where you can observe it before placing it into your display tank, make sure you follow the above procedure before placing livestock into your quarantine tank
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