Powder Blue Tang (Acanthurus leucosternon) - Marine World Aquatics

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The Powder Blue Tang, Acanthurus leucosternon, also known as the Powder Blue Surgeonfish, has a disk shaped body, featuring a bright light blue body with a yellow dorsal fin and...
Regular price £39.99

Collection: Fish

The Powder Blue Tang, Acanthurus leucosternon, also known as the Powder Blue Surgeonfish, has a disk shaped body, featuring a bright light blue body with a yellow dorsal fin and caudal peduncle, and a darker face outlined in white. Making it a real eye catcher in your aquarium. The Powder Blue Tang also has a scalpel at the base of their tail fin which is very sharp and is used by the Tang for protection from predators, as well as a way of establishing itself with tank mates. Caution should be used when handling Surgeonfish as a cut from its scalpel can cause discoloration and swelling of the skin with a high risk of infection. The pain lasts for hours then still ends up having a dull ache.

 A minimum 50 gallon tank will be OK temporarily for a juvenile, as they are rather slow growers, but keep in mind that too small of an environment can stunt their growth and they can develop 'behavior issues'. Like most other Surgeon fish or Tangs, the Powder Blue Tang likes water with a moderate to heavy flow, creating currents to swim in. Being very active during the day, they require a large tank with plenty of open room to swim about while also providing plenty of live rocks and or Corals to offer some cover if frightened, and to sleep in at night. Lush natural algae growth in the tank is suggested in order for the Tang to be able to graze upon in between meals. They may also jump out of an open aquarium, so be sure to have a tightly fitting lid.

Being a peaceful fish in nature, it will get along with most other peaceful tank mates, though it will aggressively defend its territory against other Surgeon fish and Tangs, and is best kept individually. This Tang is particularly intolerant of other Tangs and should be the last fish added to your community aquarium. Unless you have a huge system, like a few hundred gallons or so, it is best to to keep only one Powder Blue Tang per system. Like all Tangs, they do not have scales to help protect them, they also do not produce as much skin mucus on their bodies as other fish, making them susceptible to diseases such as Marine Ich and Marine Velvet. Pristine water conditions should also be maintained for the overall continued health of this Tang. However, they are definitely a candidate for quarantine when you first receive them. They can be treated successfully with copper based medications, 
Their diet should consist of natural algae, as well as prepared frozen formulas containing algae or spirulina. Japanese Nori or other seaweed can be offered by attaching it with a vegetable clip to a rock or the glass. Vitamin enriched frozen brine and mysis shrimp should also be offered to help with a balanced diet. Live rock with heavy algae growth is ideal, as it will allow the Tang to scrape it teeth along the rock. Feed at least 3 times daily, in smaller amounts instead of a large quantity once a day. This will help with higher water quality over a longer period of time. They will thrive in a temperature range of 75 - 79° F and a pH of 8.1-8.4.

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We are extremely confident in the health of all livestock we send out and combined with our shipping methods offer your our Live Arrival Guarantee. In order to eligible for our Live Arrival Guarantee, please note the following:
YOU MUST ADHERE TO THE FOLLOWING DOA (DEAD ON ARRIVAL) PROCEDURE CORRECTLY, FAILING TO DO SO WILL NULIFY YOUR CLAIM.
In the unlikelihood of your order being DOA please email or telephone us within 1 hour of signing for the package on day of receipt.
EMAIL: info@marine-world.co.uk (leave a telephone number to call you back on)
TEL: 07779162162 / 01274416425
Once you have notified us you then have 24 hours to provide us with the following photographic evidence:
For marine fish we require:
  • A clear photograph of the fish in its original sealed bag, you must capture the entire bag with contents and seal still in tact clearly evident before taking the 2nd picture.
  • A clear photograph of the fish out of its sealed bag and water, with its entire rear caudal tail fin cut off.
  • You will know if your fish is dead as it will sink down to the bottom, observe for fin movement and discolouration, most fish sink when they die, but float to the top as they begin to rot. Closely observe the aquatic life upon acclimatising if it hasn’t moved don’t presume its dead but sometimes they are just resting. We advise to add air stone to acclimatising this will increase oxygen level to your live stock. Monitor the fins and gills for any sort of tiny movements, if in doubt call us.
For marine inverts we require:
  • A clear photograph of the fish in its original sealed bag, you must capture the entire bag with contents and seal still in tact clearly evident before taking the 2nd picture.
  • A clear photograph of the marine invert out of its sealed bag and water, with the invert being either cut in half or a sharp object such as a small knife skewered directly through it.
For corals we require:
  • A clear photograph of the fish in its original sealed bag, you must capture the entire bag with contents and seal still in tact clearly evident before taking the 2nd picture.
  • A close up photograph of the coral out of its sealed bag but still in water, (Photographs taken of corals not in water, will not be accepted, as some corals can look distorted/dead out of water).
  • All photographs need to be clear and not distorted. Photographs that do not clearly show their subject will be unable to be accepted as evidence.
  • Failure to be present to sign for your parcel on the first delivery attempt will void all claims. Failure to follow Marine World Aquatics specified DOA reporting procedure will also void any claims.
  • On satisfactory evidence that the marine life is DOA a credit note will be issued.
Please see review our recommended acclimatisation procedures for corals below to ensure your new coral adjusts to your system with the least possible stress.
Acclimatising your new corals is a vital process to ensure they survive and thrive in your system. People use many different methods but most of them are very similar, below is our preferred choice:
  • Unpack coral carefully from box and keep it in the polythene bag or container that it was shipped in.
  • Float the bag or container in your sump area or main tank for around 20 minutes, this will equalise the temperature of the water in the bag to that of the system it is going to be placed.
  • Open the bag or place coral with shipping water into another small container.
  • Using a piece of airline or similar with an air control valve attached, if one not available then just tie a knot in the airline, start a siphon from the main system and drip water slowly from there into the bag/container housing the new coral ( I use around one drip per two seconds ). Once the bag/container is near full then disregard some of the water and continue the process (never put any of the shipping water into your system). I persevere with this process for around 90 minutes to ensure the new coral is fully acclimatised to the new water conditions.
  • Now it is time to remove the coral from bag/container and carefully place it in your tank somewhere near the bottom. Leave it there and raise it slowly over a period of days so as it can adjust to the different lighting on your tank.
This careful process is vital to ensuring your coral or any other livestock’s long term success.
The same above process can be use for Fish and Inverts however this is not recommended, we strongly advise you put all livestock into a quarantine tank for 30 days where you can observe it before placing it into your display tank, make sure you follow the above procedure before placing livestock into your quarantine tank
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